Tag Archives: watermelon

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Eating Garbage

A couple of years ago I learned that 40 percent of the food in the United States goes uneaten — more than 20 pounds per person every month.  According to the NRDC, reducing that waste by just 15 percent could feed more than 25 million Americans every year, no small feat when one in six Americans is unsure of where their next meal is coming from.

With that in mind, I have challenged myself to eat what I may previously have tossed in the trash or composting buckets.  Beet greens now get sautéed, mushroom stems get turned into soup stock, and squash seeds get dried and toasted. 

A few weeks ago, as I was enjoying the first watermelon of the season, I recalled eating watermelon rind pickles as a child.  They came from the grocery store in tall, skinny glass bottles and, because they were expensive, they were a once or twice a year treat.  I loved them.

This resurrected memory prompted me to ask myself why I was throwing out the rind.  Why wasn’t I turning it into the beloved pickles of my childhood?  After trying a recipe sent to me by a friend, I know I’ll never make that mistake again.   Eating “garbage” can be indescribably delicious!

Eating Garbage

 

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Surprise!

I was away from home last week, working on the other side of the country.  When I returned, a visit to my farmers market was very near the top of my “To Do” list.  Once there, I found the summer produce season at its peak, and amaranth, corn, lemon cucumbers, sweet onions, green garlic, chilis of every variety, baby eggplant, carrots, zucchini, okra, edamame, sugar snap peas, English shell peas, cranberry beans, watermelon, cantaloupe, peaches, cherries, blueberries, and countless varieties of tomatoes, all found their way into my cart.

I still have no idea what I will do with most of it, but I can hardly wait to find out.  I love a surprise!

Surprise!

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Orange Watermelon

The first time I cracked open a watermelon and found bright orange flesh, I did a double-take.  Was this some unusual variety of cantaloupe?  It was certainly the color of cantaloupe . . . but it had the texture and flavor of watermelon.  In fact, it was one of the tastiest watermelons I’d ever eaten.  A little investigation revealed that orange watermelons have been around for nearly fifty years and grow better in cooler climates.  That includes New York.  And that means I’m no longer surprised when I crack open an orange watermelon; I’m just delighted.

Orange Watermelon

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Summer Picnic Food

I really don’t have anything to say about the barbecued chicken, corn on the cob, watermelon, and Southern Tier beer in this photo.  As typical summer picnic food, I think it speaks for itself.  For those of you who can’t hear it, I’m pretty sure it’s whispering, “Enjoy me now. The season is passing far too quickly!”

Summer Picnic Food